[Webinar Recording] Using Imagery to Create Powerful, Impactful Presentation Stories

Try GoToWebinar free for 30 days, and save 20% on an annual subscription. Give it a try today.A picture is worth a thousand words and using imagery in your presentations does make an impact enabling your content to come alive. In this webinar, moderated by Editor Sharyn Fitzpatrick, we share tips on how to find the right imagery for your content and how to use it in a design. Microsoft PowerPoint MVP Nolan Haims showcases several design options for

Register on Nolan’s site, Present Your Story.com to get access to the handouts.

each slide and why it works. This is a perfect tutorial for the non-designer.

Topics include:

  • How to identify a good image from a bad image in your searching;
  • Harnessing the rule of thirds;
  • Creating “image sets” for consistency;
  • The power of transparency and gradients in PowerPoint;
  • Why you should cut the heads off people yes, really!;
  • Advanced image editing, no Photoshop needed;

The right way to compress files As a bonus, we explore where you can find images to use including sourcing across a variety of stock websites for all budgets.

About Nolan Haims:
Nolan runs Nolan Haims Creative, a visual communications and design consultancy that help organizations and individuals tell more effective stories with fewer words. As a Vice President and Director of Presentation for Edelman, he created and ran a department dedicated to raising the bar on visual communications and ensuring the firm showed up differently at pitches. During his tenure with Edelman, he oversaw nearly 500 high-stakes new business pitches as the firm grew by 64%. As a designer and art director, he has created high-end presentations for Fortune 500 CEOs, leading financial institutions, top foundations, and all the major television networks. Nolan trains organizations to think visually and to create and give more effective presentations. He speaks at national conferences and writes extensively on visual storytelling including at his own site, PresentYourStory.com. Microsoft has recognized him as one of only 11 PowerPoint MVPs in the U.S for his contributions to the presentation community. He is also one of three co-hosts for the Presentation Podcast.

[Webinar Recording] How to Make Powerful Infographics in PowerPoint

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In today’s world of information overload and shortened attention spans, organizations are using infographics – graphic visuals that combine words and data into education, persuasive, audience-appealing designs – to quickly deliver information to audiences, both external and internal.  Infographics have quickly become one of the major forms of communication in the digital age.

Watch this webinar with graphics guru, Mike Parkinson and you will learn tips and tricks to make professional infographics fast and get low-cost and free tools to help quickly render them. NO design skill or previous experience needed. Explore the current trends and best practices then apply those techniques in your next presentation. Review infographics from around the world and discover how to do it yourself (and what not to do), and improve the quality and effectiveness of your presentations by adding powerful infographics.

In today’s world of information overload and shortened attention spans, organizations are using infographics – graphic visuals that combine words and data into education, persuasive, audience-appealing designs – to quickly deliver information to audiences, both external and internal.  Infographics have quickly become one of the major forms of communication in the digital age.

 

About our speaker:

Mike2015_bigMike Parkinson, CPP APMP Fellow, is an internationally recognized visual communication and presentation guru, solution and strategy expert, award-winning author, and trainer. He is a key contributor on multi-billion dollar projects and helps Fortune 500 companies improve their success rates. Mike shares his expertise through books like Do-It-Yourself Billion Dollar Graphics, articles, and online tools. Learn more at BillionDollarGraphics.com. He is also a partner at 24 Hour Company (http://www.24hrco.com), a premier creative services firm.

Handouts for the Webinar:

How2Lock_MikeParkinson

GraphicCheatSheet

Mike’s Infographics Slides

Five Presentation Silver Bullets You Can’t Live Without!

PXP_WatchNowIconIn this very engaging webinar with graphics guru, Mike Parkinson, you’ll learn the 5 silver bullets that guarantee a successful presentation. Each is proven to improve understanding, adoption, persuasion and/or performance. Use one or all of the silver bullets to make your next presentation a winner.

After this educational, interactive session you will:
• Build better presentations—fastersilver bullets2
• Increase understanding and recollection of even the most complex content
• Make compelling presentations
• Craft presentations that get results

Have you seen an amazing presentation? If so, one or all of the 5 silver bullets were used. The best-of-the-best presenters and presentation designers use them to make their content stand out and be remembered. Apply what you learn to PowerPoint, Prezi, Keynote, SlideRocket, Google Presentation, Emaze, Articulate Presenter, and any other presentation software you choose. The 5 silver bullets work in any presentation situation. Watch this recording now and it will change how you make presentations.

Mike Parkinson captionAbout Our Speaker:
Mike Parkinson of Billion Dollar Graphics brings a wealth of experience and talent to today’s webinar. He really understands the power of graphics. You will see him transform simple PowerPoint graphics into powerful visuals that make a statement. Mike has authored several books on presentation graphics and created several resources that any of us can used to enhance any PowerPoint presentation.

Here are the handouts for this webinar:

Slide001

Copy of Mike’s Slides 

Slide046 “Free” Graphics Cheat Sheet

 

 

 

 

 

Print

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Hacks, Tricks, and Shortcuts…Oh My! Discover PowerPoint Tricks Even the Pros Didn’t Know About!

PXP_WatchNowIconPowerPoint is an incredibly powerful program with lots of capabilities built in, and there will always be things that not everyone knows about. Plus, productivity goes out the window when you are stuck trying to figure out how to improve your PowerPoint slides or fix a problem that you can’t seem to solve.

In this recorded webinar with shortcut and productivity guru, Taylor Croonquist, you will discover hidden tricks that most presentation professionals didn’t know that PowerPoint could do.  The content will focus on how to maximize the power tools you have in PowerPoint so you can get the job done. You’ll also discover tricks and shortcuts that will make your job more efficient and less stressful. For example, do you know how to break SmartArt? Break tables? Break up a list of bullets? Or, resize and crop multiple pictures in one process?

Learning these time-saving tricks will increase your productivity and PowerPoint skills. No more pulling out your hair when you reach frustrating PowerPoint issues.

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Our Speaker

Taylor Croonquist is the shortcut and productivity guru for Nuts and Bolts Speed Training company, which helps companies build better PowerPoint slides in shorter time frames. Hailing from the home of Microsoft and Starbucks, he came up with the “One Armed Mouse” technique in order to be able to combine these two passions: PowerPoint-ing with a coffee in one hand and a mouse in the other. For more information about the company’s services, visit  http://nutsandboltsspeedtraining.com

 

Webinar Handouts:
Taylor Cheat Sheet for 12115 webinar - icon
      PXPert PowerPoint Cheat Sheet – 12115 Webinar – Taylor Croonquist

 

 

 

first page of slide deck

PXpert -012115 – Webinar Slide Deck

2 Ways to Improve Collaboration on Presentations

Many presentations are collaborative efforts and you may have discovered that putting your comments in an email and attaching the latest version of a PowerPoint file gets confusing fast. Here are some problems with that method:

  • There are multiple versions of the file all over the place
  • It’s hard to know who has the latest version
  • It’s hard to know which edits are approved and which aren’t
  • Some people open the file from within the email (you should always save it to your computer first), make changes, and then can’t find the file

If you’ve been in collaboration hell, here is Part I of two techniques that might help.

Lots of people would like a Track Changes feature in PowerPoint, like the one in Microsoft Word. But so far it doesn’t exist. But there are two features you can use instead to collaborate with others. In fact, the second one comes close to a Track Changes feature…in a roundabout way.

powerpoint-tips-collaborate-presentations-1

Add Comments to a Presentation

This is how the Comments section of the Review tab looks in PowerPoint 2013 (right). Comments provide a way for you to add your opinion or suggest changes. On the Review tab, click New Comment to open a text box, either on the slide (PowerPoint 2007 and 2010) or in a task pane (PowerPoint 2013).

Type your comment and press Enter. A new feature of PowerPoint 2013 is that others can reply to comments so that you can create a conversation. Comments will show your initials or even your photo, if you’re using a Microsoft account. You can easily move from comment to comment and, of course, you can delete comments.

Here’s a short comment conversation in PowerPoint 2013.

powerpoint-tips-collaborate-presentations-2

If a comment is collapsed or just shows as an icon, double-click it to display it.

Compare Two Presentations

The Compare feature lets you compare two presentations. For example, you can have a presentation on your computer and then send a copy of it to someone else to review. That person will make changes and return it to you. The Compare feature shows you the differences between the 2 presentations. Follow these steps:

  1. Save your presentation on your computer. You’ll compare this presentation with the one that your colleague changes.
  2. Send the presentation to a colleague. If you attach it to an email, this process creates a copy. You can also post the presentation to a shared location, such as your OneDrive storage. In that case, you’ll need to give your colleague the link to the presentation and provide editing permission. In the email or link notification, ask your colleague to make suggested changes and return it to you with another name (such as v2 at the end of the file name).
  3. When the changes are done, open your original presentation and choose Review tab, Compare.
  4. In the Choose File to Merge with Current Presentation box, navigate to the changed presentation and click Merge. The Revisions panel opens, listing the slide and presentation changes. (Changing the theme or adding a slide would be presentation changes.) You’ll also see an icon on a changed slide showing the changes, as you see below. This is as close to Track Changes as you can get in PowerPoint.

powerpoint-tips-collaborate-presentations-3

 

  1. To accept a change, check the checkbox in front of it. When text was replaced, you need to check both the insertion and the deletion. If you don’t accept a change, the presentation stays as is on your computer.About the Author:

    Ellen Finkelstein can train you or the presenters in your organization to create high-impact, engaging, professional presentations for training, sales, business, or education. For more information, visit her website at www.ellenfinkelstein.com

How to Play Vimeo and YouTube Videos from PowerPoint Slides

When considering use of videos on YouTube or Vimeo.com in your PowerPoint presentations, they can be used if the owner permits use for presentations and public viewing. Some vimeo.com videos have a download link that allows you to download the video as a file to your computer; YouTube videos don’t have a dedicated download link.

The method I describe here creates a hyperlink from an image on your PowerPoint slide that starts playing the video in a full browser window on top of the presentation. When the browser is closed after the video finishes, the PowerPoint presentation continues.

Advantages of this method:

  • Does not require a video file to be downloaded or captured
  • Allows video to be at as high a resolution as the owner uploaded it (some people only download at lower resolutions)
  • Easy for even inexperienced presenters to use
  • Smaller file size since no embedded video
  • Don’t need to worry about broken video file links
  • Doesn’t rely on specific codecs of video files; if it plays in a browser, it will play during the presentation
  • Works when you send the PowerPoint file to others since the video is not a linked file
  • Works on both Windows and Mac platforms
  • Works on all versions of PowerPoint

Disadvantages of this method:

  • Requires an internet connection during the presentation fast enough to stream video from viemo.com or youtube.com
  • Viewers see browser toolbars & other parts of the browser
  • Viewers see the operating system task bar
  • May see ads on videos if the service allows them on that video
  • May see suggested videos after your video finishes playing
  • May take a few seconds for the video to start playing as the service buffers the video
  • Video may pause if the network is overloaded or the Internet is slow

Here are the steps to link to the video from a PowerPoint slide and have it play when the link is activated.

Step 1: Go to the web page on vimeo.com or youtube.com with the video you want to insert

VimeoPage

Step 2: Take a screen capture of the video page (use PrtScrn in Windows or Cmd+Shift+3 in Mac). Insert the screen capture on your slide. Crop the screen capture so just the video frame is shown. Make the image as large as you want on the slide. Add text to give credit to the owner of the video.

ImageOnSlide

Step 3: Select the image and add a hyperlink to the image.

For videos on vimeo.com: The hyperlink web address is http://player.vimeo.com/video/<vidnum>?autoplay=1 (where <vidnum> is the video number on vimeo.) You can find this number by clicking on the Share button on the vimeo video page. It is after the “vimeo.com/”.

This link, when activated, will open a browser window and start playing the video in the full browser window.

VimeoNumber

VimeoHyperlink

For videos on youtube.com: The hyperlink web address is http://www.youtube.com/embed/<vidcode>?autoplay=1 (where <vidcode> is the video code on youtube.) You can find this code by clicking on the “Share this video” link on the youtube video page. It is after the “youtu.be/”. This link, when activated, will open a browser window and start playing the video in the full browser window.

YouTubeCode

YouTubeHyperlink

Step 4: Playing the video in the presentation

Before starting the presentation, open your default browser and make it full screen. Test that you can access a website so you know the Internet connection is working. Close your browser so it will open full screen when opened with the hyperlink.

In Slide Show mode, to play the video, activate the hyperlink on the image by clicking on it with your mouse or by pressing Tab, then Enter. The browser will open on top of the presentation and the video will start playing full sized in the browser. (If you double-click on the image, you may start the video playing behind the PowerPoint presentation. If this happens, use Alt+Tab in Windows to switch the active application to the browser window with the video.)

If you want to remove the browser scroll bars and toolbars, you can press F11 in Internet Explorer or Chrome. The only way to remove the task bar at the bottom of the screen is to set it to automatically hide itself in the operating system.

When the video has finished playing, close the browser using the red X or using Alt+F4 in Windows. You will return to the slide that started the video. You are now back in the presentation.

Note: This method uses the embed code provided by vimeo.com and youtube.com at the time this article was written in February 2014. The sites may change these codes at any time, which may break this method. This method may work in other presentation software, but has only been tested in PowerPoint.

For those who don’t mind getting a little more technical with PowerPoint, John Wilson has this tutorial on how to embed a video from Vimeo or YouTube into a slide as a Flash object.

Editor’s Note:  Join Dave Paradi for a focused, hands-on workshop about turning financial and operational data from Excel into effective visuals for your presentations. Dates for these upcoming workshops are April 10 in Toronto, Ontario and May 7 in Denver, CO. For details and registration visit www.MakeNumbersVisual.com.

About the Author:

Dave Paradi runs the Think Outside the Slide website, is a consultant on high-stakes presentations, the author of seven books and a PowerPoint Most Valuable Professional (MVP.) For more information, visit www.thinkoutsidetheslide.com

Tabs Provide Roadmap for Long PowerPoint Presentations

When you deliver a long presentation with lots of topics, you can help your audience understand and remember more by explicitly displaying the presentation’s organization.  A training session comes to mind as an example. People also like to know where they are in a presentation. A visual list of topics helps them relate each topic to the totality of the presentation.

One way to do this is with a tabbed presentation. It looks somewhat like links at the top of a website. Here’s a simple example of a first slide.

powerpoint-tips-tabbed-presentation-with-topics-1

I prefer to keep the tabs simple so that they don’t distract from the main content, but you can format them any way you want.

Here’s how I created the tabs:

  1. Go to View, Slide Master.
  2. In the left-hand pane, scroll up to the top, larger thumbnail. Whatever you place on this master will appear on every slide, no matter which layout it uses.
  3. Draw the tabs. You could put them at the bottom instead. I used the Round Same Side Corner shape in the Rectangles section. You can drag the yellow square or diamond to adjust the size of the rounded corner. You’ll have to fiddle with the size and placement to fit the desired number of tabs across the slide. You can see that I made the Home tab smaller than the others; I did this because I needed more space for the topic names — and wanted to emphasize them as well. You’ll probably also have to adjust the placement of some of the text placeholders to make room for the tabs.
  4. Click the Normal View icon at the bottom of the screen to return to Normal view and create all of your slides. You can create a “topic” slide at the beginning of each topic, but it isn’t necessary.  The Section layout is good for this, but you can also use the Title Slide layout or any other layout that works for you.
  5. Return to the Slide Master. You can now add hyperlinks to each of the sections and they will work on
    every slide.
  6. Select the first tab, being sure to click the tab’s outline (border), not the text inside it. You want the hyperlink to work if you click anywhere on the tab and you probably don’t want the text to be underlined and change to the hyperlink theme color.powerpoint-tips-tabbed-presentation-with-topics-2
  7. Press Ctrl + K or go to the Insert tab and click Hyperlink in the Links group.  (You’ll do this in the Slide Master.)
  8. In the Link To pane of the Insert Hyperlink dialog box, choose Place in This Document.
  9. In the larger pane, choose the desired slide. For the Home tab, you would choose the first slide of the presentation. For subsequent tabs, you would choose the first slide of the corresponding topic.
  10. Click OK to create the hyperlink and close the dialog box.
  11. Add hyperlinks to the rest of the tabs.
  12. Exit the Slide Master to return to Normal view.
  13. Test all of your hyperlinks!

It’s possible to create the tabs on your slides in Normal view. You can create one set, add the hyperlinks, and copy them to the rest of the slides. The hyperlinks will follow. This method has 2 problems that I can think of:

  • It makes the presentation file larger (but probably not by too much)
  • If you want to reformat the look of the tabs, you have to do so on every slide, instead of once on the Slide Master.

This method has one advantage. If you want, you can format the current tab differently. For example, during Topic 2, the Topic 2 tab can have a darker fill and white text. But you’ll need to individually change the formatting on every slide of the presentation.

It’s possible to create a separate master for each section and format your tabs differently in each master. Then you would apply a different master to each topic.

Delivering a Tabbed Presentation

You can go through the presentation as usual, if you want. You don’t even have to use the tabs! But if someone asks a question about an earlier topic, you can easily go back to it by clicking the topic’s tab. In some situations, you might also let your audience choose the topics they want to hear and in which order. I called this a menu-based presentation.

Download the presentation!

I have a page of free PowerPoint backgrounds. Click here to go to the page and download the tabbed presentation.

About the Author:

Ellen Finkelstein is a noted presentation design consultant and trainer, a Microsoft PowerPoint MVP and author of a number of top-selling books in the presentations field. For more information, visit http://www.ellenfinkelstein.com/

Use Simple Images In Powerpoint Presentations

Use images that support your talking points. A picture tells 1000 words. People are much more likely to remember your talk if you use interesting images instead of bullet points.

What Do We Remember from PowerPoint Presentations?

During 2012, Dr. Carmen Simon, co-founder of Rexi Media, carried out a major research study on memory – specifically, on how many slides people actually remember from a typical PowerPoint presentation. The study was based on significant changes in information processing and delivery that have taken place in the past decade:

  • An exponential increase in the amount of information delivered, and the time spent consuming it.
  • A sense of being overwhelmed by the quantity of information available, while still craving more.
  • The ubiquitous use of PowerPoint, or PowerPoint styles (landscape slides, templates, bullet points) to deliver information.
  • Presentations that all look the same, making it very difficult for messages to stand out.

Over 1,500 participants were invited to view a short, online PowerPoint presentation of 20 slides. Participants were randomly assigned to one of the 26 conditions, which included different versions of the presentation. After 48 hours, they were asked to recall anything they could remember about the presentation.

There were several key findings:

  • Participants remembered on average 4 slides out of the 20.
  • Neutral images helped recall when compared with text only, but not to any great extent.
  • Participants remembered content according to a pattern, not just random slides.
  • Significant changes every fifth slide tended to aid recall.

What does this tell us? How can we use this information to improve our presentations? Carmen Simon suggests that there a number of important clues:

The Magic Number Four. Studies suggest that people can only hold about 4 or 5 items at a time in short term memory. The important thing is therefore to make sure that we point them at the right things to remember.

People remember the unusual. If everything in a presentation is equally intense (color, graphics, in your face etc), or equally bland (text, indentations and bullet points), we have no control over what, if anything, people will remember.

Concrete visual language aids recall. The most remembered slides in the study were those about what colors to wear or not to wear when presenting online (don’t wear red, don’t wear black, white or stripes, but pastel colors are good). In these cases, pictures might help, but most people can picture the text anyway without much help.

color coordinate Simon

Color coordinate your slides


Grouping your slides, “chunk” your presentation
. Sometimes this can be done by the color of the text or the background, or maybe by the use of a different set of images. Well thought-out connections between different parts of a presentation are more important than just pushing more content.

People crave novelty. If you want a presentation to attract attention, find out what your audience would consider to be novel. People are more likely to remember what they find new and surprising, rather than what they find familiar. Where information differs from what we would expect, we sit up and take notice.

Repitition aids recall Simon

Repetition aids recall

 

Repetition and alliteration helps. The most memorable slides in the research all used the word “wear.” Using the same word, or finding three or four words that begin with the same letter to stress your key points will probably make the ideas stick in the mind.

People remember negative advice (what not to wear) better than neutral or positive content. However, at the same time, it played on their vanity – do this, or don’t do this in order to “look good.” Another frequently remembered slide suggested presenters should not lean back in their chairs as it made them appear short and fat. In a society that craves positive images, ego enhancing content attracts extra attention, and aids recall.

Ego boosting content Simon

Ego-boosting content

For more information about this topic, download a fully referenced paper  on the Rexi Media research.

About the Author:

Rexi Media, a presentation skills consulting company based in San Francisco, works with over thirty specialists in the field of advanced presentation techinques.

 

How to Insert Audio Clips in PowerPoint 2010

When you insert an audio clip into a PowerPoint slide, you can control its volume, set it to play looped, or even hide the audio icon. These are some of the advanced options available for any inserted audio clip in PowerPoint. Remember that these advanced options only exist so that you can use them when they are required, rather than using them just because they exist!

Let me now explore these options:

  1. Open your presentation, and navigate to the required  slide where you have already inserted an audio clip. Select or double-click the audio clip to bring up the two contextual Audio Tools tabs in the Ribbon. These two tabs are Format and  Playback — click the Playback tab to activate it, as shown  highlighted in red within Figure 1.Fig 1 Geetesh March
    Figure 1: Audio Tools Playback tab of the Ribbon2. Within the Audio Tools Playback tab, locate the Audio Options group, as shown in Figure 2.

Fig 2ab Geetesh march

Figure 2: Advanced audio options within the Audio Tools Playback tab

Within this group you’ll find the advanced audio options. Let us explore them as marked in Figure 2 above:

A. Volume:  This button enables you to set the volume for your audio clip. Click the downward arrow within the Volume button to open the Volume drop-down gallery, as shown in Figure 3. Within the Volume drop-down gallery choose one of the following options: Low, Medium, High, and Mute.

Figure 3 Geetesh March

Figure 3: Volume drop-down gallery

Note that you are restricted to set the volume at only the Low, Medium and High levels within the Volume drop-down gallery. On the other hand, you can set the volume to whichever level you want by clicking on the Volume button on the Player Controls bar below the actual audio clip on the slide, as shown in the bottom right of Figure 4, below.

Figure 4 Geetesh march

Figure 4: Volume button in the Player Controls bar

B. Start: Here you can specify how you want your audio to start during your presentation. Click the Start list to bring up a drop-down list, as shown in Figure 5.

figure 5 Geetesh march

Figure 5: Start drop-down list

There are three options within the Start drop-down list:

1) Automatically: Play your audio when the slide (containing the audio) appears in Slide Show view, automatically.

2 ) On Click: Plays your audio by clicking on the audio itself in Slide Show view.

3) Play across slides: Plays your audio across the slide. You can learn more about this option in our Sound Across Slides in PowerPoint 2010  tutorial.

C. Loop until Stopped: Plays your audio repeatedly and continuously when the  active slide is shown.

D. Hide During Show: Select this check-box to hide your audio clip graphic in Slide Show view. This option makes sense       only if you set the Start option for the audio to be Automatically or Play across Slides. On the other hand, if you choose On  Click, you should never pair that with selecting the Hide During Show check-box — if you do so, you won’t be able to see anything you can click!

E. Rewind after Playing: Select this check-box to rewind your audio once it has played during your presentation. This can be useful if you need to play an audio clip more than once while you are still presenting the same slide which contains that audio clip.

3. Choose options based on your requirements. Make sure  you save your presentation.

About the Author:

Geetesh Bajaj has been designing and training with PowerPoint for 15 years and is a Microsoft PowerPoint MVP (Most Valuable Professional.) He heads Indezine (www.indezine.com)  a presentation design studio and content development organization based in Hyderabad, India. The site attracts more than a million page views each month and has thousands of free PowerPoint templates and other goodies for visitors to download. He also runs another PowerPoint-related site (http://www.ppted.com) that provides designer PowerPoint templates.

 

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